(VIDEO) Explosions at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Reactor

by the Left Coast Rebel

Video of an explosion at the Fukushima Nuclear plant:





STRATFOR.com (trending at Memeorandum) is claiming that the nuclear plant is in "nuclear meltdown" which isn't accurate. The New York Times has details:
An explosion at a nuclear power plant in northern Japan on Saturday blew the roof off one building, brought down walls and caused a radiation leak of unspecified proportions, Japanese officials said, after Friday’s huge earthquake caused critical failures in the plant’s cooling system.

Television images showed a huge cloud of white-gray smoke from the explosion. Soon afterward, government officials said an evacuation zone around the plant had been doubled, to 12 miles. [. . .]

Images on Japanese television showed that the walls of one building had crumbled, leaving only a skeletal metal frame standing with smoke billowing from the plant. The Associated Press reported that the damaged building housed a nuclear reactor, though that report was not immediately verified by nuclear officials. The cause of the explosion was unclear, with some experts speculating that it may have resulted from a hydrogen build-up.

There was no immediate confirmation of news reports that the container of the nuclear reactor itself had escaped damage.

Updated 3/13/2011: Japanese officials admit 'partial' meltdown? The Other McCain links the Washington Post (via Memeorandum):

Japan’s top government spokesman says a partial meltdown is likely under way at second reactor affected by Friday’s massive earthquake.
Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said Sunday that radiation at the nuclear power plant in Fukushima briefly rose above legal limits, but it has since declined significantly.
Three reactors at the plant lost their cooling functions in the aftermath of quake and tsunami because of a power outage.
Edano said operators released slightly radioactive air from Unit 3 Sunday, while injecting water into it as an effort to reduce pressure and temperature to save the reactor from a possible meltdown.
Still, a partial meltdown in the unit is “highly possible,” he told reporters.
“Because it’s inside the reactor, we cannot directly check it but we are taking measures on the assumption of the possible partial meltdown,” he said.
There's a lot more at The Other McCain.

4 comments:

  1. Take a look at this analysis ... I think we will have bad news regarding this nuclear facility within the next 48 hours. The authorities are attempting to control panic by releasing information very carefully and slowly ...

    emsnews.wordpress.com

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  2. >There was no immediate confirmation of news reports that the container of the nuclear reactor itself had escaped damage.

    The report on the live Japanese news about 30 minutes ago was that the container was intact.

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  3. I blame the commies for this. Check out Karl Marx in the plume just to the left of center at 0:58.

    Great round-up, Tim. Link forthcoming.

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  4. The report by STRATFOR is possibly the most lame and brain damaged report I’ve every seen in all my life. What is clear is that these folks haven’t a f-ing clue what is going on in these nuclear plants.

    As the pile of nuclear material in the containment vessel gets hotter and hotter it will create a bit of hydrogen (H) and Oxygen (O) gas from the moderating water (H2O) causing a build up in pressure. The operators usually vent some of this excess gas into the containment building which surrounds the containment vessel. Over time this creates a very explosive environment within the containment building till .. “pop” .. the containment explodes. (Hydrogen gas usually explodes in a quick almost invisible pop). This is not a “meltdown.”

    While this isn’t a good situation, this isn’t the biggest problem they have on their plate. They still must finish cooling the containment vessel, which they can probably still do even with the containment building in rubble, so the pile won’t melt into a molten nuclear mass at the bottom of the containment vessel (or worse, melt through the bottom of the vessel). At this point it seems that the damage to the reactor most likely will be irreparable, but it’s not the end of the world.

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