TSA: Terrible Screening Activities

By Proof

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From San Diego, the airport that brought you "Don't Touch My Junk", brings the sequel: "Don't Show us, We'd Rather Feel For Ourselves".

Sam Wolanyk says he was asked to pass through the 3-D x-ray machine. When Wolanyk refused, Transportation Security Administration (TSA) personnel told him he would have to be patted down before he could pass through and board his airplane.

Wolanyk said he knew what was coming and took off his pants and shirt, leaving him in Calvin Klein bike undergarments.

“It was obvious that my underwear left nothing to the imagination,” he explained. “But that wasn’t enough for the TSA supervisor who was called to the scene and asked me to put my clothes on so I could be properly patted down.”



"asked me to put my clothes on so I could be properly patted down.”

Excuse me, but isn't the purpose of the pat down to ascertain that nothing harmful to the flight is hidden under a person's clothes? If virtually everything is in full view, the pat down should go a lot quicker. "Put your clothes on so we can pat you to see if there's anything under them"? That makes no sense. This is security kabuki and this passenger was improvising on his part. Handcuffing a guy and frog marching him through the airport for ostensibly making the screener's job easier? Unbelievable!

More at Gateway Pundit

Cross posted at Proof Positive

4 comments:

  1. He should have a pretty good case for a lawsuit, if nothing else, which I hope has a lot of zeros attached. There's nothing illegal about stripping down to biking shorts, and there's nothing about having clothes on which assists the security screening process. I applaud the man for demonstrating how monumentally incompetent and abusive the TSA really is, and how the screenings have nothing to do with security. If any story deserves to go viral, this one does.

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  2. The only thing I could see them getting him on is a "failure to comply". They told him to do something, he didn't. The fact that the request might have been ludicrous on its face may not be enough to save him...unless he gets a jury trial!

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  3. On the one hand, it would seem that this new security regime is over-the-top. On the other, let's be honest, the same people who complain about it would be the first to scream bloody murder if the terrorists blew up another airplane.

    So to some extent the TSA is in a no-win situation. But even so, these security procedures are a step too far, and my prediction is that the outcry will force a revision.

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  4. Tom: I think you've got a good read on this. The TSA can't do nothing, but the excesses here clearly need to be addressed or people will stop flying and that will hurt the airlines.

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