Sad day at Bloomberg: reporter Heidi Przybyla doesn't know the difference between "fostering job growth" and "wanting a government job"

By Conservative Generation for Left Coast Rebel

I read Bloomberg on a regular basis. Aside from the Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg is one of the best publications for general business and economic news. That's why today's piece by Heidi Przybyla must be a fluke. Heidi misunderstood her own poll when she wrote:

More than 90 percent of Tea Party backers interviewed in a new Bloomberg National Poll say the U.S. is verging more toward socialism than capitalism, the federal government is trying to control too many aspects of private life and more decisions should be made at the state level.

At the same time, 70 percent of those who sympathize with the Tea Party, which organized protests this week against President Barack Obama's health-care overhaul, want a federal government that fosters job creation.

Heidi doesn't seem to understand that wanting a government that fosters job creation is not the same as wanting a government job. In fact, limiting government through tax cuts and deregulation is a well documented method in economic circles for increasing employment in the private sector. Don't worry Heidi. Unlike, Think Progress and Firedoglake, I actually know the difference and since it is in my magnanimous nature, I'm willing to set you straight.

Just say three Hail Marys, correct your article and I will absolve you.

Via Memeorandum

UPDATED: Jeffrey Small from the John Galt Pledge site weighed in on this issue with a brilliantly succinct comment:

Good article, but I think this actually points up an extremely important issue rather than simply a faux pas on Heidi's part.

We really are using the wrong terminology to discuss the economy whenever we tie it in any way to the government, as with the phrase "promote job creation". It would not surprise me to hear that many people at the Tea Party protests actually do think that the government should be taking an active, interventionist role in getting our economic engine moving again, as opposed to the passive role of simply getting out of the way. This is because we have a culture that may feel it understands freedom -- including economic freedom -- in its gut, but, due to generations of indoctrination by government run schools, actually has a real intellectual understanding of neither the foundational roots of freedom growing out of the Enlightenment philosophy embodied in the Bill of Rights and Constitution, nor an appreciation of what free-market capitalism is and how it actually functions. If a writer and editor for Bloomberg can get it wrong, it's no wonder that average people in non-economic fields do so as well.

The public needs to be educated in these matters, and the first and best thing we can do is start by challenging every attempt to connect government actions with economic ones. Instead, when discussion what government needs to do, we must frame the issue as one of a completely inward focus on dismantling government, rather than an external focus on "fixing" the world.

We need to get people to understand in much clearer terms than they do today, that it is not the economy, or health care, or education that is broken. These are all symptoms of a broken government, and it is government that must be repaired.


By the way, if you haven't taken the John Galt Pledge, you should do so.

1 comment:

  1. Good article, but I think this actually points up an extremely important issue rather than simply a faux pas on Heidi's part.

    We really are using the wrong terminology to discuss the economy whenever we tie it in any way to the government, as with the phrase "promote job creation". It would not surprise me to hear that many people at the Tea Party protests actually do think that the government should be taking an active, interventionist role in getting our economic engine moving again, as opposed to the passive role of simply getting out of the way. This is because we have a culture that may feel it understands freedom -- including economic freedom -- in its gut, but, due to generations of indoctrination by government run schools, actually has a real intellectual understanding of neither the foundational roots of freedom growing out of the Enlightenment philosophy embodied in the Bill of Rights and Constitution, nor an appreciation of what free-market capitalism is and how it actually functions. If a writer and editor for Bloomberg can get it wrong, it's no wonder that average people in non-economic fields do so as well.

    The public needs to be educated in these matters, and the first and best thing we can do is start by challenging every attempt to connect government actions with economic ones. Instead, when discussion what government needs to do, we must frame the issue as one of a completely inward focus on dismantling government, rather than an external focus on "fixing" the world.

    We need to get people to understand in much clearer terms than they do today, that it is not the economy, or health care, or education that is broken. These are all symptoms of a broken government, and it is government that must be repaired.

    Regards,
    --
    C. Jeffery Small

    ReplyDelete

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